Alfred Cordon Obituary

Alfred Cordon Obituary

Millennial Star – DECEASE AND FUNERAL OF BISHOP ALFRED CORDON

DECEASE AND FUNERAL OF BISHOP ALFRED CORDON

Alfred Cordon was the second son of Sampson and Myrah Cordon, and was born at Toxteth Park, near Liverpool England, on the 28th day of February, 1817, and at the time of his decease was 54 years and two weeks old.
He was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the year 1839, by Elder David Wilding, in Manchester, England.
He commenced to preside in Willard City in the year 1857. He died on the 13th instant (March) at 2 p.m., and was buried on the 15th, in the afternoon.
The funeral services commenced at one o’clock. The coffin was borne, on the shoulders of the Teachers, from his late residence to the school-house. An immense concourse of people was present, not over one-half of whom could gain admittance.
The meeting was called to order by Elder Geo. W. Ward.
After singing and prayer, short, appropriate to and consolatory addresses were delivered by President Lorenzo Snow and Elder Jonathan C. Wright. Singing and prayer closed the services.
The people turned out en masse to join in the procession, which was in the following order- At the head was the body in charge of Elders George W. Ward and M. W. Dalton; several conveyances containing the near relatives of the deceased; the Presidency of the Stake; Bishop Nichols and some ten carriages with visitors from Brigham City; some fifty conveyances containing citizens of this place. The rear was composed of the brethren and sisters of the choir and a long column of citizens afoot. The line formed was over half a mile in length.
The assembly formed in circles around the grave, where the services consisted of singing and prayer.
It was very gratifying to witness the many little acts of kindness extended by the people in general to the bereaved. Each seemed to vie with the other in the offices of encouragement and consolation.
Thus passed to his resting-place a staunch veteran in the cause of God. He was a zealous advocate and determined defender of the faith. From his commcement in the ministry, some thirty years ago, until the day of his death, he was on terms of the closest intimacy with the Presidency of the Church.
His sickness (inflammation on the lungs) lasted but a few days, and he passed from this life, as he had often expressed a wish to do, without a lengthy sickness, and free from the cares and anxiety which often surround the deathbed.
It would be superfluous to pass any eulogium upon his life and services, as there are but few of the experienced members of the Church who are not more or less acquainted with the name and services of Alfred Cordon.
He leaves a large family and a very extended circle of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.
[We copy the above from the Deseret News. Elder Cordon was well and widely and favorably known in various Conferences in this country, having labored faithfully and energetically in disseminating the principles of the Gospel in this country previous to his emigration to Nauvoo, and also during his mission in 1848-50. Many of the British Saints will regret his departure from this mortal life and revere his memory.-Ed STAR]

Deseret News – Death of Bishop Cordon & Funeral Services

DEATH OF BISHOP CORDON.-The following telegram was received by Deseret Telegraph line this morning:
“WILLARD CITY, 13. Bishop A.M. Musser:-At 2 o’clock this afternoon our Bishop, Alfred Cordon, departed this life; he had been suffering from inflammation of the lungs for a week past. Further particulars hereafter. Funeral tomorrow.
GEO. A. MEARS.”
The announcement of the death of Bishop Cordon will be received with surprise by his many friends. It is but a few days since he was in this city, seemingly hearty and robust, and, judging from his appearance, likely to live for years; and being a man well known in and very generally respected by the entire commmmunity, the news of his death will be a cause for great regret.

FUNERAL SERVICES.-We have received the following short obituary, and account of the funeral services for the late Bishop A. Cordon, which took place at Willard City a few days since:
“Alfred Cordon was the second son of Sampson and Myrah Cordon, and was born at Toxteth Park, near Liverpool England, on the 28th day of February, 1817, and at the time of his decease was 54 years and two weeks old.
He was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the year 1839, by Elder David Wilding, in Manchester, England.
He commenced to preside in Willard City in the year 1857. He died on the 13th instant at 2 p.m., and was buried on the 15th, in the afternoon.

FUNERAL

The funeral services commenced at one o’clock. The coffin was borne, on the shoulders of the Teachers, from his late residence to the School House. An immense concourse of people was present; not over one-half of whom could gain admittance.
The meeting was called to order by Elder Geo. W. Ward.
After singing and prayer, short, appropriate to and consolatory addresses were delivered by President Lorenzo Snow and Elder Jonathan C. Wright. Singing and prayer closed the services.
The people turned out en masse to join in the procession, which was in the following order: At the head was the body in charge of Elders George W. Ward and M. W. Dalton; several conveyances containing the near relatives of the deceased; the Presidency of the stake; Bishop Nichols and some ten carriages with visitors from Brigham City; some fifty conveyances containing citizens of this place. The rear was composed of the brethren and sisters of the choir and a long column of citizens afoot. The line formed was over half a mile in length.
The assembly formed in circles around the grave, where the services consisted of singing and prayer.
It was very gratifying to witness the many little acts of kindness extended by the people in general to the bereaved. Each seemed to vie with the other in the offices of encouragement and consolation.
Thus passed to his resting-place a staunch veteran in the cause of God. Whatever may have been his shortcomings, none can reproach him with lack of loyalty to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a zealous advocate and determined defender of the faith. From his commencement in the ministry, some thirty years ago, until the day of his death he was on terms of the closest intimacy with the Presidency of the Church.
His sickness (inflammation on the lungs) lasted but a few days, and he passed from this life, as he had often expressed a wish to do, without a lengthy sickness, and free from the cares and anxiety which often surround the death-bed.
It would be superfluous to pass any eulogium upon his life and services, as there are but few of the experienced members of the Church who are not more or less acquainted with the name and services of Alfred Cordon.
He leaves a large family and a very extended circle of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

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